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HISTORY

 

The dream of STARBASE was to create a program that would respond to the needs of children by offering alternative, stimulating, hands-on activities. A military installation, with its exclusive high-tech resources seemed like the perfect setting.

With more than a year of collaboration and preparation between community and military leaders, STARBASE (then known as Project STARS) offered its first five-day academy at Selfridge Air National Guard Base, Michigan.

The academy was a success but, despite this, there was no funding to carry the program beyond this trial week. It was entirely a volunteer effort. The program had to secure financial support to ensure long-term operations.

These funds came in the spring of 1991. The W.K. Kellogg foundation awarded a grant to the program, and STARBASE opened its doors year-round.

The fall of 1992, before STARBASE completed its first full year of operation, brought even more support. With valuable assistance from Senator Carl Levin of Michigan (retired), Washington legislators signed into law language that funds STARBASE under the Department of Defense.

Today, STARBASE has grown to more than 50 sites across the nation, including Puerto Rico.

STARBASE One student makes mathematical calculations for his robotic system.
STARBASE One student makes mathematical calculations for his robotic system.

The dream of STARBASE was to create a program that would respond to the needs of children by offering alternative, stimulating, hands-on activities. A military installation, with its exclusive high-tech resources seemed like the perfect setting.

With more than a year of collaboration and preparation between community and military leaders, STARBASE (then known as Project STARS) offered its first five-day academy at Selfridge Air National Guard Base, Michigan.

The academy was a success but, despite this, there was no funding to carry the program beyond this trial week. It was entirely a volunteer effort. The program had to secure financial support to ensure long-term operations.

These funds came in the spring of 1991. The W.K. Kellogg foundation awarded a grant to the program, and STARBASE opened its doors year-round.

The fall of 1992, before STARBASE completed its first full year of operation, brought even more support. With valuable assistance from Senator Carl Levin of Michigan (retired), Washington legislators signed into law language that funds STARBASE under the Department of Defense.

Today, STARBASE has grown to more than 50 sites across the nation, including Puerto Rico.